Electricity collected from the air could become the newest alternative energy source. Scientists have been such device to capture electricity from the air. It works much like solar cells capture sunlight and using them to light a house or recharge an electric car.

If we know how electricity builds up and spreads in the atmosphere, we can also prevent death and damage caused by lightning strikes, noting that lightning causes thousands of deaths and injuries worldwide and millions of dollars in property damage.

The notion of harnessing the power of electricity formed naturally has tantalized scientists for centuries. Sparks of static electricity formed as steam escaped from boilers. Workers who touched the steam even got painful electrical shocks. It's the electricity formed, for instance, when water vapor collects on microscopic particles of dust and other material in the air. But until now, scientists lacked adequate knowledge about the processes involved in formation and release of electricity from water in the atmosphere.

Scientists once believed that water droplets in the atmosphere were electrically neutral, and remained so even after coming into contact with the electrical charges on dust particles and droplets of other liquids. But new evidence suggested that water in the atmosphere really does pick up an electrical charge.

Scientists used tiny particles of silica and aluminum phosphate, both common airborne substances, showing that silica became more negatively charged in the presence of high humidity and aluminum phosphate became more positively charged. High humidity means high levels of water vapor in the air. The vapor that condenses and becomes visible as "fog" on windows of air-conditioned cars and buildings on steamy summer days.

This was clear evidence that water in the atmosphere can accumulate electrical charges and transfer them to other materials it comes into contact with. In the future, it may be possible to develop collectors, similar to the solar cells that collect the sunlight to produce electricity, to capture hygroelectricity and route it to homes and businesses. Just as solar cells work best in sunny areas of the world, hygroelectrical panels would work more efficiently in areas with high humidity, such as the northeastern and southeastern United States and the humid tropics.

A similar approach might help prevent lightning from forming and striking. He envisioned placing hygroelectrical panels on top of buildings in regions that experience frequent thunderstorms. The panels would drain electricity out of the air, and prevent the building of electrical charge that is released in lightning.

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